Re-Skill-ience Workshop Series

G.A.L.A. hosts hands-on homesteading and bushcraft workshops about everything from beekeeping to fermenting foods to grafting and beyond! Learn more here.

Start a Study Circle

Every year G.A.L.A. helps communities in NH organize Study Circles – small groups of people coming together to learn about topics of sustainability in a fashion similar to a book club.  Learn more.

Sustain-A-Raisers and You!

Sustain-A-Raisers are volunteer-led installations of raised garden beds, rain barrels, compost bins, cold frames, and clotheslines! Inquire about hosting or volunteering for a Raiser today!

Next Make Your Own Rain Barrel Workshop August 1st!

 

Global Awareness Local Action (G.A.L.A.) and the Green Mt. Conservation Group (GMCG) are pleased to announce our collaborative “Make Your Own Rain Barrel” workshop being offered next Wednesday, August 1st.   Participants will be building 55 gallon capacity rain barrels made from recycled food-grade plastic drums.  Up to 15 people will get to go home with a finished rain barrel of their own! If you missed the boat on G.A.L.A.’s annual Rain Barrel & Compost Bin Sale, or you are simply more of a do-it-yourself type of person, than this workshop is just for you!

Why use a rain barrel?  There are many reasons for harvesting your rain water, including conserving water, saving money and energy, and reducing pollution.   Let’s begin by exploring conservation.  In the summer months, outdoor tasks such as watering lawns and gardens typically account for 40 percent of household water use.  This seasonal jump in consumption can lead to increase in water withdrawals from our rivers and reservoirs.  Rain barrels, however, are a free source of non-potable water that can be used as a substitute for town, municipal, and well water when performing a variety of household tasks like watering flowers or washing windows.

As for saving money and energy, consider this – electricity represents approximately 75 percent of the cost of municipal water processing and distribution.  Similarly, nationwide, about 4 percent of US power generation is used for water supply and treatment (Dept. of Energy). On a smaller scale, by using a rain barrel you are also saving electricity at home by letting gravity to the work instead of your pump.

And what about pollution?

Runoff pollution, also known as “nonpoint source pollution”, occurs when rainfall or snowmelt moves over and through the ground.  While water runs from our homes and lawns, it picks up anything on the ground such as litter, excess fertilizer, pet waste, and motor oil and transports it to storm drains that do not treat the water before it enters our waterways. Rain barrels play an important role in protecting our water resources by collecting the storm water runoff from our homes before it reaches our local streams and rivers.

 

But maybe, just maybe, the most important reason to collect your rainwater is simply because it’s the frugal Yankee way!   Come on your own or family and friends to build your very own rain barrel designed for an easy connection to both hose and gutter.  The cost of the workshop is $5 per person, plus an additional $60 if you are one of the limited people who intend to leave with a finished barrel.  The workshop take place from 4-6pm at the Huntress House in Effingham, NH at 196 Huntress Bridge Road.  For more information or to RSVP contact G.A.L.A. by calling 603-539-6460 or email josh@galacommunity.org.